About Peter Maybarduk

Peter Maybarduk is a Washington, D.C.-based songwriter and a human rights lawyer.

Resist the Watch List

Business interests lobby the US government to bully developing countries into changing their economic laws and practices so as to favor the commercial interests of multinationals. Unfortunately this can come at the expense of health, education and other sensitive public interests. We are countering the corporations’ analysis and arguing for a more independent US government policymaking that defends global health.

For example, I testified at a recent hearing by the US Trade Representative, criticizing the US Government’s Special 301 “Watch List.” At stake is India’s key role helping facilitate global access to affordable medicines. Read more here.

A Certain Peace

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This gallery contains 33 photos.

No one quite smiles in Basel. Not on the tram and not in the café.  Each of ten men sits at his separate table on a Sunday, reading the paper quietly. Our access to medicines team doesn’t quite fit. We’re … Continue reading

South Africa’s Space Cowboys

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This gallery contains 8 photos.

December 2013 — A few days into our conferences, we attend the memorial service for Nelson Mandela in Cape Town stadium. There’s a sense that the formal and relatively conservative Johannesburg ceremony seen on world television may not have been … Continue reading

Morning in Cape Town

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This gallery contains 8 photos.

It’s a perfect Cape Town dawn, my first. Table Mountain looms large from the waterfront. I’m staring through plate glass windows and a well-kept garden of succulents. Morning’s long light is gentle on everything. The Atlantic and Indian Oceans meet … Continue reading

Battling Pharma Around the Globe

Peter Lima demoOctober 2013: Click here for an article I wrote about our access to medicines work in Public Citizen News. “By providing analysis and building relationships to influence what goes on inside the secretive Trans-Pacific negotiations, Public Citizen’s Global Access to Medicines Program has transformed key elements of the discussion.”